the press release blog guidelines for writing a press release

Your press release is a piece of marketing. And like all marketing materials, it needs a call to action. A simple hyperlink to where readers can download, purchase or learn more about your game works best.
One of the reasons that we chose PR Newswire for our top list of paid and free press release services is because they have one of the largest press release distribution networks over multiple media sources.
PressReleasePing.com – Is the press release distribution and submission website for the business people to boom their business through seo and link building. They will syndicate your featured press release to dozens of partner newswire websites at no additional cost to you. You can get RSS feeds for all posted press release in each zone.
And television stations are a different story entirely. If you’re trying to get air time for an event, send out your press release to your local TV stations at least two days beforehand. Since news varies from day-to-day, a car crash can prevent stations from covering your event. But your chances are even lower if they receive your press release the same day.
Ideally, you want your press release to land in the recipient’s primary inbox. This is why you should not send bulk emails to hundreds of contacts. Using Mailchimp or another newsletter service will usually get your email categorized as a promotion, not primary inbox material. Even individual emails can end up in the spam folder if the sender’s email / domain is blacklisted. Check yours here:
Title. Concisely describe what the release is about. For SEO, try to use a client keyword phrase in the title, preferably at the beginning and in place of the business name. “Sunshine Coast IVF” is one of our target keywords. I could have optimized this title further by putting our keyword first with a title like, “Sunshine Coast IVF Clinic Announces Opening Of New Clinic In Buderim.”
When you send a press release, it’s a good idea to include a short outline of your idea (no more than a paragraph) and where you think it might fit in the publication you’re pitching to. Paste your press release underneath, as a busy journalist may not bother to an open an attachment. Photos can be helpful if they add something to the story, but avoid sending big files that will clog up peoples’ inboxes.
This rule cannot be stressed enough. The simple mathematics of this equation are as such. Cheap distribution is not good; and good distribution is not cheap. Distribution costs money, plain and simple.
The last step in writing a press release is to write the phone number(s), fax, email, website addresses and other links for social media platforms where the business is active. In addition to this, you can also write about your business partners and potential clients in this section. Make sure you conclude the press release with a call to action.
Sounds pretty hopeless, Wrong. While relationship-building still helps you get into popular publications, we now have the opportunity to quit playing the waiting game and generate our own buzz. By turning your PR strategy into an inbound one, you create opportunities that weren’t there before and carve out a place for your company, building meaningful mindshare with your target audiences in the process.
An effective press release takes time and effort in order to be put together correctly. If you are just sending them out with no strategy or purpose involved, most of the time they simply fall on deaf ears.
Ensure that your social channels are all set up to syndicate your press release. Key channels to consider include: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn, Reddit, Pinterest, Instagram, Google Plus, Delicious, and Pitch Engine. When syndicating your press release, you will want to access the dashboard and find different major mediums that it was posted to for distribution. Use a different medium for each social channel syndication. For example:
Next, follow the steps in the section below, so you know what to look out for and how to get your link published on a specific site. Please report any errors, so that everyone can continue to benefit.
Sources: http://www.shiftcomm.com/blog/the-worst-times-and-days-for-press-releases/ https://prinyourpajamas.com/when-to-send-your-press-release/ http://www.ereleases.com/pr-fuel/whats-the-best-time-to-publish-a-press-release/ https://www.prnewswire.com/blog/the-best-times-to-send-a-press-release-globally-12563.html
Get serious about building relationships with journalists and influencers in your industry. In the real estate industry, for example, Twitter is not mainstream. However, we leverage Twitter for sourcing news for our blog and relationship building with government agencies, journalists, and writers. I put contacts in lists, include their stories in our blog posts, retweet their work, and I also capture their contact information and connect with them on other social platforms. When I do have something important to reach out about with these contacts, the goal is for them to see my email and say: “Oh, I know this guy” and have that also have a positive undertone. This is a longtail, relationship building strategy, one that your competitors are unlikely to follow.
Maplewood area banks loaned less than $1 to people in the primarily minority neighborhoods of Maplewood for every $5 they loaned to people in wealthier neighborhoods [what], according to a study released yesterday [when] at a press conference [how] held in front of a downtown bank [where] by the Maplewood Community Reinvestment Coalition [who].
good site by the way, informative and helpful…I am wondering if you happen to know of the 50+ sites that the PressReleasePoint.com folks send their releases too…for $15 bucks it’s a steal, but I also don’t want to duplicate my efforts either…I did sign up, sent out my first release through them a couple hours ago… I did also write them to ask them the same question, but since you seem to know a great deal about (free sites in general), I was wondering if you knew the answer to my question…thank you in advance…
Distribution services have a role to play, yet they are signaling that everybody has received the same story. To avoid making that uninspiring impression, there are many other strategies, such as one TransMedia Group has used successfully over the years. One is called a “patterned release,” which simply targets journalists in a particular market by sending a release directly to the journalists who would most likely be interested in that particular story.