national press release press release for new product

Free press releases can be an important part of a larger SEO and marketing strategy. can be a great complement to other search engine tactics and can bolster your social media profiles, blogs, and other content marketing tactics.
Although free press release distribution websites may seem like an easy public relations tactic, PR experts generally recommend avoiding them or at least being extremely leery of them. Paid news distribution services offer far better results, assert PR and SEO gurus.
Do not waste time writing the headline until the release is done. Copy editors write the real headlines in newspapers and magazines, but it is good to come up with a catchy title or headline for the release. This headline may be your only chance. Keep it concise and factual. It’s a good idea not to write it until after you finish the press release. You don’t know yet exactly what you—–or those you interview, will say. When you have finished a draft of the release, you may decide to revise your lead—or not. Then, and only then, think about the headline.
A crowdsourced report from G2 Crowd found that Cision ranked highest among the best press release distribution networks for customer satisfaction. One professional explained that Cision “makes vital information for PR professionals easily accessible” — so it’s easy to keep contact information, preferences and outlet information organized in one place. Added perks include free webinars and permanent archiving. Analytics data is another strong suit for Cision’s press release service. However, with a price starting at $5,700 annually, Cision is one of the more expensive newswires out there.
Subheads are remarkably useful tools, yet usually overlooked by press release writers. Basically, the press release subhead gives you the opportunity to flesh out your angle and further hook the reporter, without stepping on the drama of the press release headline.
Press releases are an essential element of any public relations strategy. These short, compelling documents detail product releases, event announcements and other newsworthy items a company produces. As CEO of the tech PR firm Cutler Group, it’s my job to help take the business dealings of innovative tech startups and turn them into press coverage — and one of the first steps my team and I take is writing good press releases on our clients’ behalf.
ReleaseWire is our “go to” press release distribution service. We like ReleaseWire because it’s affordable, easy to use and has great reach. It also functions well for clients in a number of different industries.
Immediately following your grabber, compel readers to continue on with an engaging game description. Be sure to weave in core benefits, as well as what makes your game unique. Here is a great press release example of a strong game description.
Headlines written in bold! A bold headline also typically uses a larger font size than the body copy. Conventional press release headlines use the present tense and exclude a and the, as well as forms of the verb to be in certain contexts.
Offer details here that strengthen your narrative, like creative or noteworthy ways your company developed the project or announcement at hand. Or, when applicable, comment on future implications of your announcement. 
Too many quotes are put into press releases simply to acknowledge the presence of a CEO, partner, sponsor, client, etc. There’s nothing wrong with having endorsements, just make sure they say something worthwhile.
Press releases are still a legitimate way to help tell company stories, educate potential clients and customers, and secure earned media coverage. We have great success with writing and pitching press releases – we’ve sent a couple this year that have generated earned media coverage with an ad value equivalent worth $1 million or more.
It might seem trivial, but the most important part of your press release is the headline. Most journalists are incredibly busy, and their inboxes are overflowing with generic press releases. Unless you’ve got a snappy subject line, chances are that your press release will go straight in the bin without getting read. So, what constitutes snappy?
Thanks, Kari! You’ve confirmed what I thought. I’m a (very) small business on a shoestring startup (or maybe just baling twine) but with a unique, timely and as far as I know, unheard of product. Waiting to be discovered is a bitch so I want to make some noise that will be heard. As far as one-on-one emails to reporters, do I start at the top with GMA? 😉
If you were going to write a press release about your new product, it needs to be newsworthy. In other words, nobody wants to read a press release that just says, “Hey, we made a thing!” Instead, arrange your press release so that it includes the most unique benefits of your new product.
Your press release is then posted online and added to an email digest that gets sent to reporters…along with all the other press releases in your industry that were distributed that day. I asked Dan Tynan, former editor of Yahoo! Tech and current reporter for The Guardian, if he ever scrolled through these press release digests.