free expand press release free press release sites 2016

([City where the news takes place in brackets])- In one or two sentences, write the main news or point of your press release. These can be longer sentences, but there should never be more than three in this paragraph. You’ll not be able to fit all your details in here, and that’s ok.
Less than 24 hours. Our editorial team quickly reviews and notifies you of any corrections that need to be made. Press releases are reviewed in 12 hours or less. Fast turnaround times are our priority.
Most importantly, make it interesting: Keep in mind that reporters get dozens, if not hundreds, of releases each day, so invest the time to write a compelling headline. It’s worth the time and effort on your part. 
One of the reasons that we chose PR Newswire for our top list of paid and free press release services is because they have one of the largest press release distribution networks over multiple media sources.
No estimates can be given as to when your press release, if picked up by our PR editors, will go live on our site and via our distribution channels. It all depends on current workload and backlog, and sometimes can take weeks long. Next day distribution is guaranteed if one of paid PR distribution packages is used.
Add your contact information. If your press release is really newsworthy, journalists would surely like more information or would like to interview key people associated with it. If you are comfortable with the idea of letting your key people be contacted directly by media, you can provide their contact details on the press release page itself. For example, in the case of an innovation, you can provide the contact information of your engineering or research team for the media.
The final thing to consider regarding your press release is how much editing it will take. Remember, a press release is meant to be picked up by the media, and pushing one out that includes errors or other mistakes can be devastating to your company. With that in mind, set aside ample time to edit your press release before you publish it.
Once you have decided that you have a story to tell, you need to understand the rules for writing a press release. These are designed to make it as easy as possible for journalists to use your material.
Because reporters are busy people, you must assume that they will only read the first sentence and then scan the rest — and even that’s a generous assumption. Get the message of your press release out quickly. Every important point should be addressed in the first few sentences. The subsequent paragraphs should be for supporting information.
If possible, include a link to an online copy of the same release. It’s good practice to keep a log of all of your press releases housed on your own website. This can make providing such a link easier to produce, as well as keeping a for historical purposes.
All press releases must include a headline, sub-heading and a notes to editors section listing the contact information of the academics mentioned. The number of paragraphs will vary according to the newsworthiness of the story, however, the introduction must always answer the five Ws and a quotation is always needed. It is good practice to limit press releases to approximately 300-350 words, featuring the key information presented with an angle in mind. 
The biggest mistake you can make is sending out a blanket press release without knowing its recipient or recipients. Make sure if you’re sending a release about your country band that you’re not targeting a newspaper’s transportation reporter or movie critic. Get to know a little about the writer or writers you really want to target before you email them, whether that’s reading their work or following them on social media.
The key to keeping your PR strategy new school is forgetting preconceived notions of what public relations is and instead focusing on creating highly remarkable content. Traditional press releases can still be really valuable when executed well, so instead of ditching releases as a tactic, give them a modern makeover to make them more useful for your marketing. 
Annie Jennings: This site has a wide range of media testimonials, although it is light on detail of exactly what you will get for your money, or even how much money you will be required to part with.  The unique angle to this service seems to be a focus on connecting authors with media opportunities, such as TV and radio appearances.