press conference example how to press releases

Following up on the advertising toolbox, you also need to let the media (oh if only there was a site about web 2.0 and social networking where you could get covered…) know about your new venture. We’ve gathered 20+ sites that will help you with getting your press release out in the world for free.
Two recent examples of that: some company sent me a release about WIFI in prisons. Did you know that prisons are now, finally, getting WIFI? I didn’t. So I pitched that to my editor at The Guardian, and she came back with an idea for a larger story about prisons and whether the internet should be considered a “right” for inmates to have.
A press release is written in different ways depending on the situation. However, if we consider a standard press release template, it begins with the name of the company, their contact number and email address of the person who wrote it. Also, the press release is printed on the letterhead of the company which must have the company’s slogan along with the above mentioned particulars.
This is a good list. Almost too good to be true–can you speak to the visibility and credibility of these free press release sites? We’ve already used one paid pr service, but are hesitant to pay a second one. We are a lean startup–we could allocate these services elsewhere. Thanks for the list, and thanks in advance for your valuable response!
These free release services often serve as an excellent learning opportunity to discover how to hone your writing and distribution techniques and ensure that, once you do move to a paid distribution option, you will have mastered the art of structuring and writing a press release. 
While this may seem like a simple approach, it serves a critical purpose. First, it gives journalists something to pull out of your press release and use in publication. Second, it inspires confidence within the people reading your press release.
Send the press release out in a timely fashion. Sent too early, people won’t remember it; sent too late, they may already be committed to something else. Two to three weeks in advance is a good timeline.
Here’s a press release that was created for fitness expert Pauline Nordin. It starts with the most important information: a new app release, and follows with a reason why you should care (Nordin outsold famed fitness trainer Jillian Michaels). It was effective because it gave all of the facts and was easily quotable for journalists interested in the story.
Include a photo – Sending a picture along with the press release is crucial as it personalizes the release and makes it stick out in people’s minds. The picture we included was able to immediately put a face to the name and hopefully made people want to learn more about the woman in the photo.
Again, this is where a PR agency can be a huge benefit. The media monitoring and outreach databases that PR agencies use are incredibly expensive, and can be cost prohibitive for many companies to take on internally. The tools and services we use at TCF cost over $40,000 per year, which gives us a lot of capabilities and contacts that the average business owner or marketing department doesn’t have.
I know it seems easy, but careless errors can result in your release not getting published with your link in it. Take your time, read the instructions for each press release site, and follow the steps below.
Hi Keith, thank you for the comment. This is all great insight and I appreciate you taking the time to post it here. Because both you and Craig posted similar comments, I want to make sure I clarify the intention of this post. This post is meant as a guide for how to correctly format a press release for general distribution using AP Style guidelines and other best practices. It is not meant to provide tips for how to contact writers. As you allude to in your post, and as I preach on my site, sending a template-driven message to every journalist you reach out to, is not a good idea. Each message you send should be personalized and tailored to the interests of that journalist’s audience. In regards to what format you use for your press release. Journalists have their preferences as to which format they like to receive press releases in. I’ve worked with writers that span the gamut on this. That said, I think your points about copying and pasting the text into the body of your email over a attaching a Word document are completely valid. When I recommended Word in the previous comment, I was speaking to the specific context of general distribution, i.e., when you submit your press release to sites like Games (Games Press requests Word document attachments as its preferred method to receive press releases in it’s submission instructions to avoid running into copying and pasting issues: http://www.gamespress.com/about_howtosubmit.asp). Looking back on my comment, I think I could have been way clearer though 🙂 Apologies for that. Again, I appreciate both your and Craig’s input here. It’s great to hear this feedback straight from journalists.
BriefingWire.com lets you setup multiple Business Profiles which is great for client submissions. In fact, the company profile page provides a dofollow link, even before you submit your first release!
You can also hire an agency that has access to a media database – we use Meltwater for this, but Cision is also a good option and there are several others. You can gain access to these databases yourself, but it’s very costly (around $20k/year). When you go with an agency, you’re splitting that cost among other clients – and some agencies will pull you a media list for a fee, and let you handle the outreach. Contact us if you’d like to learn more!
Name recognition: Clout that comes with big recognizable names (well know people, organizations, companies, etc) will likely increase the interest in your news. If you’re partnering with, or involved with a big name that might generate this type of attention, consider issuing a press release.
An alternative is the self-published press release. In this approach, press releases are either sent directly to local newspapers or to free and paid distribution services.[7] The distribution service then provides the content, as-is, to their media outlets for publication which is usually online.
A la carte pricing is $200 per month and includes all of the steps outlined above in the Step By Step Instructions. You get one press release written for you each month and published to approximately 7-10 quality press release “Winners” as mentioned on this site.
We have many clients who have seen real benefit from PR – not just in terms of media placement, but the results that the media placement delivers. Plus, advertising doesn’t give you the same SEO returns as the backlinks received from earned media coverage. PR is very rarely a one-and-done solution to a company’s problems, but it can be a critical part of the solution and it’s definitely worth considering. I just wouldn’t rely on a press release distribution service alone to make the magic happen.