mighty putty billy mays press release how to write a news release ap style

Before you start thinking a press release is going to solve all your publicity woes, now is a good time to note that by itself, a press release isn’t going to get you a lot of media attention. The average reporter or editor gets more press releases than he or she could possibly use. Your press release should be just one part of your media campaign.
State your case and do it quickly. Include a sentence or two about your news. What’s the name of the new album, what song is getting the most buzz, the name of the tour, if there is one, and any special guests or opening acts who will appear as part of the show. Paragraph two should have the brisk feeling of this paragraph.
When I am launching a new product or service, I select the top 6 sites based on PageRank and Sites Linking In. My purpose is not only to generate publicity over time, but also to build quality backlinks to my website where readers can purchase my product or get more information. I distribute one new press release every two weeks until I have submitted six. During and after this time, I track my results to determine how effective I was.
“There aren’t really a prescriptive number of or word count.” If I may add one important aspect from journalism school 101: any article for a newspaper (and a press release ideally ends up as an article “as if” the journalist had written it him/herself) needs to be structured in such a way, that you can clip from the end (!!!) without it losing stringency and closure. That is entirely different from creative writing. “A Winter’s tale” or an Agatha Christie whodunit would lose much, if not all, of its charm if you left out the last, say, two, paragraphs! But since (in the olden days) a piece of journalism needed to fit in with the rest of the layout (including advertising and late breaking news), whoever redacted a piece had to be able to cut off bits and pieces at the end without having to read, let alone reformulate the rest of the article. That said, this rule still stands today though space is not always a bottleneck in the digital world (but – you never know, maybe your press release even makes it into the print version!). So train yourself to write like a (good) journalist. If you don’t you could wonder for years what made your press releases fall by the wayside time and again.
The site offers several different press distribution options, including a free plan to submit up to one posting per day.  They also provide great press release writing tips on their “PR Resources” page.
The first paragraph must explain all the W’s while the second paragraph should talk about what is the purpose of the press release, why should you care, when it will happened and where can people find it. Also, it should cover the statistics and other factual elements to make the information more genuine and authentic for the media and audience to believe.
“A great press release should include a great quote from a company executive or industry expert,” says eReleases President Mickie Kennedy. “An important thing to know about quotes is that the media generally won’t use them unless they are evocative, fresh or state something in a way that would be very difficult to paraphrase. To ensure your quote finds a home in a story based on your announcement, avoid cliches or generalizations.” More info at “You Can Quote Me On That!”
A book press release is a means by which you showcase your book to journalists and news organizations in an interesting manner.  Basically, you’re doing the work for the journalist or news publication by writing it for them.  The best news is (pun intended) that most will actually accept the same news story that others have accepted, which is aptly known as mass syndication.
It’s simple. A press release is a one to two page document used to call attention to your company and its products/services. They are written in very formulaic ways, and with good reason. Hundreds, if not thousands, of these press releases come onto the scene every day. If they all took different formats, it would be a nightmare for the press to handle.
Indeed, great press releases do more than keep the media and the industry-at-large informed of your company’s recent developments. They are meant to pique the interest of journalists, who may seek to cover the topic further. Crafting a great press release is often the first step in securing a magazine feature or television interview — and thus, more visibility and new customers.
When composing your press release, collaborate with team members and other writers you trust. Ask for feedback. Send test emails with different subject lines to ask your team to rate how they responded to reading them. It’s also good to have someone other than yourself to proofread the final version.