book press release distribution press release formt

What separates i-NewsWire from all the other online press release websites is the impressive listing of all their distribution partnering companies. The channels included on the home page range from RSS feed distribution, search engine distribution, and new sites distribution. 
Get the basic structure down. All right, now that you’ve got the meat of it together, how do you put it onto paper? Well, for starters, cut it to length. It should be a page long at most, if that. No one’s going to waste time on 5 paragraphs unless you’re covering WWIII. Here’s what you need (some of which we’ve already covered):[3]
The question is whether or not you’re targeting publications that would really be a good match for your news story. If so, I would write down a few of the important names and send them a personalized message, in addition to your press release.
I’m so glad that you found this post helpful. We will be updating our list periodically to ensure that our recommendations remains current. Keep checking back to find out which sites we believe are the best paid and free press release sites.
This may come as surprise to small business owners, as a number of press release distribution services advertise that their press releases are “SEO optimized” or “SEO friendly”. What they mean is that the press release is coded in a way where if a person types in certain keywords, particularly into Google News, then the press release is more likely to appear in the results than a non-optimized release. How much more likely? I haven’t seen one company yet give hard numbers. It’s more likely that this is an advertising gimmick that press release distribution services use to sell their service to less informed clients.
Those same fancy PR tools I mentioned earlier enable PR pros to mass-email your release to as many journalists as they want. This is a terrible feature and PR reps as a whole will get a much better reputation if it ever goes away. There are even “coverage wizard” options that will auto-pull lists of journalists, editors and producers for you based on a specific beat. While this can be a good starting point, it’s important to A) research each person before you reach out to them, and B) never mass pitch everyone at once (in case I haven’t made that clear enough yet).
Written a book and want people to know about its existence? Put your words into a press release and let your marketing team do the distribution for you. You can use the following press release template.
The lead, or first sentence, should grab the reader and say concisely what is happening. For example, if the headline is Careen Publishing releases new WWII novel, the first sentence might be something like, Carpren Publishing, Ltd., today released their first World War II novel by celebrated writer Darcy Kay. It expands the headline enough to fill in some of the details, and brings the reader further into the story. The next one to two sentences should then expand upon the lead.
CONTACT INFORMATION: Remember to include contact information for the corresponding author, including his/her name, email, phone number, and institution. Provide information for accessing the original paper, such as a URL or DOI.
As with most good writing, shorter is usually better. Limit yourself to one page, though two pages is acceptable. This will also force you to condense your most salient information into a more readable document — something journalists are always looking for.
Communicate the 5 W’s (and the H) clearly. Who, what, when, where, why ––and how–– should tell the reader everything they need to know. Consider the checklist in context the points below, using the example above to generate our press release:
As PR and marketing practices have evolved to meet audiences’ constantly shifting needs, so has the press release. When looking at the press releases distributed across PR Newswire day in and day out, we see an ever-growing variety and no “one-size-fits-all” method to writing them.
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Once you have ended the text of the press release, it’s a good idea to put one final note at the bottom that encourages someone who would like more information to reach out to you. Something like: “If you would like more information about this topic, please call [Name] at [Phone number], or email [email address].”
Although the utilization of press release material can save a company time and money, it makes the distributed media boring and similar to the output of other firms. In the digital age, consumers want to get their information instantly and this puts pressure on media companies to output as much material as possible. This often causes them to heavily rely on the use of press releases in order to create their stories.[8]
As you are not writing to your target audience directly, you need to write your press release in the third person. So “ABC Ltd has signed a £5 million deal with XYZ Ltd” not “We’ve signed a deal with…”
The final thing to consider regarding your press release is how much editing it will take. Remember, a press release is meant to be picked up by the media, and pushing one out that includes errors or other mistakes can be devastating to your company. With that in mind, set aside ample time to edit your press release before you publish it.
I tend to model my press releases after the ones written by the professional Public Relations folks I learned from during my 20 years of working in the offline world. In order to get published in newspapers, you needed a compelling title followed by a succinct story written in 3rd person narrative that left the reader wanting more.
This demonstrates once again the need to teach young girls and boys about how to develop a positive self-image, said Jane Doe, author of I Like My Body Just As It Is. theplace4vitamins.com has done a true service by bringing these attitudes to the public’s attention.
Headlines written in bold! A bold headline also typically uses a larger font size than the body copy. Conventional press release headlines use the present tense and exclude a and the, as well as forms of the verb to be in certain contexts.